Mary Young

Female 1831 - 1929  (97 years)


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  • Name Mary Young  [1, 2, 3, 4
    Born 6 Jun 1831  Whitby, Durham, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2
    Gender Female 
    Birth 6 Jun 1831  Whitby, Durham, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Birth 6 Jun 1831  Witby, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Burial Mount Pleasant, Sanpete County, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Fact 2 May 1847  [4
    Part of the Elder John Taylor wagon train 
    Emigration 19 Jun 1847 
    Immigration 1 Oct 1847  Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Census 1850  Salt Lake, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    United States 
    Residence 1850  Sanpete, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Residence 1850  Salt Lake, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1860  Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Residence 1860  Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Census 1870  Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    United States 
    Residence 1870  [3
    Mount Pleasant Ward 2, Sanpete, Utah Territory 
    Residence 1870  [4
    Mount Pleasant Ward 2, Sanpete, Utah Territory, United States 
    Census 1880  Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    United States 
    Residence 1880  Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Residence 1880  Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Residence 1900  Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Residence 1900  Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Residence 1910  Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Residence 1920  Moab, Grand, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Residence 1920  Moab, Grand, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Residence 1920  Moab, Grand, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried 19 May 1928  Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Find A Grave May 1929  Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Memorial # 139581 
    Death 16 May 1929  Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2
    LifeSketch Mary left as a pioneer at age 16, traveling in the Edward Hunter - Jacob Foutz Company, with her father, James (42), her mother, Elizabeth Seeley (39), Henry Young (18), Anna Young (14), Sarah Young (12), Elizabeth Young, (10), and Hannah Seeley (5) 
    Died 16 May 1929  Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 4
    • Age: 96
    OBITUARY 24 May 1929  Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I24468  My Genealogy
    Last Modified 10 Feb 2020 

    Father James Ross Young,   b. 20 Sep 1804, Lancaster, Glengarry, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Dec 1894, Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 90 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Elizabeth Seeley,   b. 29 Jul 1807, Steuben, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Mar 1900, Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 92 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Family ID F10198  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family John Henry Owen Wilcox,   b. 14 Feb 1824, Benton, Saline, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Nov 1909, Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years) 
    Married 14 Mar 1848  Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Children 
     1. Mary Mehetable Wilcox,   b. 8 Nov 1860, Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Mar 1946, Lehi, Utah, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years)  [natural]
     2. Sarah Wilcox,   b. 1 Aug 1853,   d. 14 Feb 1935  (Age 81 years)  [natural]
     3. Justus Azel Wilcox,   b. 1 Aug 1874, Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Dec 1944  (Age 70 years)  [natural]
     4. Hannah Emeline Wilcox,   b. 13 Apr 1868, Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Dec 1943  (Age 75 years)  [natural]
     5. James Henry Wilcox,   b. 10 Nov 1855, Ogden, Weber, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Nov 1939, Kenilworth, Carbon, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years)  [natural]
     6. Sabra Ellen Wilcox,   b. 6 Oct 1865, Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 May 1914, Moab, Grand, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 48 years)  [natural]
     7. Clarissa Jane Wilcox,   b. 20 Mar 1863, Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Aug 1951, Fairview, Sanpete, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 88 years)  [natural]
     8. Hazard Wilcox,   b. 15 Feb 1849, Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Oct 1928  (Age 79 years)  [natural]
     9. Elizabeth Wilcox,   b. 13 Jul 1851, Manti, Sanpete, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Jul 1942, Blanding, San Juan, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 91 years)  [natural]
     10. Martha Ann Wilcox,   b. 23 Jul 1871, Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Sep 1962, Provo, Utah, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 91 years)  [natural]
     11. John Carlos Wilcox,   b. 13 Mar 1858, Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Dec 1938, Moab, Grand, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)  [natural]
    Last Modified 10 Feb 2020 
    Family ID F2892  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 6 Jun 1831 - Whitby, Durham, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBirth - 6 Jun 1831 - Whitby, Durham, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBurial - - Mount Pleasant, Sanpete County, Utah, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsImmigration - 1 Oct 1847 - Utah, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 14 Mar 1848 - Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - United States - 1850 - Salt Lake, Utah, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1850 - Sanpete, Utah, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1850 - Salt Lake, Utah, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1860 - Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1860 - Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - United States - 1870 - Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - United States - 1880 - Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1880 - Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1880 - Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1900 - Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1900 - Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1910 - Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1920 - Moab, Grand, Utah, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1920 - Moab, Grand, Utah, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1920 - Moab, Grand, Utah, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 19 May 1928 - Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsFind A Grave - Memorial # 139581 - May 1929 - Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDeath - 16 May 1929 - Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 16 May 1929 - Mount Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOBITUARY - 24 May 1929 - Utah, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Smith Family
    John and Mary Wilcox
    John and Mary Wilcox
    Mary Young
    Mary Young
    Mary Young
    Mary Young
    John and Mary Wilcox
    John and Mary Wilcox
    A Brief History of Edward Wilcox I

  • Notes 
    • John Henry Owen Wilcox and Mary
      Young
      Contributed By: Pauline Edgley · 22 October 2015 · 0
      Comments
      A Brief History of the Descendants
      of Edward Wilcox I
      From the year 1638 to the Present Time (December 1935)
      (I found this in a printed paperback booklet in the 1950's,
      perhaps from the old SL genealogy library . I do not know
      who wrote it, but I laboriously typed it up those many years
      ago, and share it now, for what it is worth. P. Edgley)
      The genealogy of the Wilcox family in the new world has its
      beginning in the early colonial history of North America.
      During the summer of 1630, seventeen vessels sailed from
      different ports of England, most of them landed at Salem
      and Charleston. From 10 to 15 hundred persons arrived in
      America that year, and it is quite definitely known, that
      among them were three brothers by the name of Wilcox.
      While their given names and the exact date of their coming
      to America is not known, a careful research has revealed the
      fact that they did come to the new world about ten years
      after the landing of the Mayflower in 1620, and that one of
      them went to Canada to make his home, one settled in
      Connecticut, and the other in Rhode Island.
      The first written information, however, is that disclosed by
      the municipal and church records at Portsmouth, Rhode
      Island. Here we found the name of Edward Wilcox, born
      during the year 1638, son of the Rhode Island settler
      mentioned above.
      It is from this point we are to trace a direct line of
      descendants and to portray as best we can from the facts
      available at this time, the ancestral background of the
      Wilcox family to the present time.
      Their forefathers belonged to the great Anglo-Saxon race,
      which endowed them with an indomitable will to conquer
      and win; the courage to master the hard things of life, and
      overcome all difficulties and vexing problems and never
      retreat.
      They were destined to be among the founders and builders,
      not only of a new nation, but also to become pioneers and
      defenders upon the battle line of its onward march of
      civilization and progress.
      The rock-bound and ocean-swept coast of New England was
      their first home. The biting winds of winter in a cold, barren
      region far from home and friends, was their bitter
      experience. The wily red men lurking in the forest primeval
      provided their first adventure with a strange and stealthy
      foe. To wrest from the deep, brown bosom of mother earth
      the bread of life, became their deepest concern.
      Amid these stern realities and severe hardships, young
      Edward grew to manhood, taking an active part in the great
      formative period of our nation’s growth and struggles.
      Nothing further is known about Edward’s descendants
      except the place and date of birth, date of marriages, to
      whom married and the children’s names for an interval of
      138 years. Their story is submerged in the turbulent stream
      of our country’s early development.
      Not until the thrilling date of 1776 are we permitted to pick
      up the thread of this narrative and weave it into the bright
      and shining fabric of family accomplishments.
      Upon the military roll of honor of that far off day is the name
      of Hazard Wilcox, “Volunteer in the service of his country.”
      He joined the continental army and marched with his
      division to Kingston and later to Exeter, Rhode Island, where
      he was mortally wounded and died on the field of battle in
      the first encounter ever to take place in his native state.
      His brave young widow carried their little son, then four
      years old, in her arms while she searched among the dead
      and dying for their loved one.
      At length she found him. Yes, it was true, for there
      gleaming in the bright New England sunshine, sparkled the
      silver buckle inscribed with his own initials, H.W., and still
      clasping the leather belt around his strong young form so
      lately fallen for freedom and liberty.
      Tenderly his body was laid to rest, but the silver buckle
      given to him by his commander, George Washington, as a
      token of his gallant offer in the hour of such urgent need, is
      still preserved as a priceless possession of each generation
      down to the present day. It is an inviolate souvenir of his
      namesake, Hazard Wilcox the 7th, and it is now in his
      hands.
      What fate befell Sabrah Wilcox after the demon of war had
      robbed her of her companion, we cannot say. But their son,
      Hazard, Junior, born December 25, 1775, in Rhode Island,
      remained there until early manhood, imbibing the spirit of
      the new freedom and rejoicing at the birth of a new nation.
      No doubt the stories of Paul Revere’s ride, of Valley Forge,
      the siege of Yorktown, and the glorious strains of the Star
      Spangled Banner left their imprint upon his heart and
      spurred him on to seek and find, to explore and subdue the
      great western lands of Arkansas, and there become the
      pioneer and frontiersman just as his fathers had done before
      him.
      After the death of his first wife, Nancy Maxon, he married
      Sarah Seely at Rhode Island, and together they set out to
      find a new home and establish themselves permanently and
      securely in, as they believed, a more favorable region.
      Just why they should have traversed a third of the continent
      to find a resting place is not clear, but the events which
      followed seem to indicate the hand of providence was in this
      move to Arkansas, and subsequently to Marion County,
      Missouri, where part of his family record is preserved.
      Their seventh child, John Henry Owen Wilcox, was born
      February 14, 1824, in Arkansas, hence their removal to
      Missouri took place after that date. Seven years later, on
      February 16, 1831, Hazard passed away, comparatively a
      young man, leaving his beloved companion and 10 children.
      Here they managed to live meagerly, perhaps according to
      the standards of that day, pursuing their daily labors in quiet
      contentment. For peace still reined in that ill-fated state,
      which was soon to become the stage where one of the
      world’s darkest tragedies was to be enacted, and where the
      powers of Satan’s fury was to slay the innocent, defile and
      dishonor the helpless and stain that chosen land with infamy
      and the blood of their fellowmen, lay waste their homes and
      set at naught the visitation of God’s messengers, sent to
      bring salvation to the earth. This good family was to witness
      this terrible upheaval and some of them were to become the
      victims of this base outrage.
      In the year 1830, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day
      Saints was organized by the boy prophet, Joseph Smith.
      That wonderful event ushered in a new dispensation of light
      and truth to all mankind. Thousands accepted its teachings
      and in due time many of them settled in Missouri, as
      directed from on high. But the malicious opposition of God’s
      work from its very beginning gained momentum with the
      years and resulted in the vile inhuman acts against the
      Saints, known as the Missouri persecutions.
      John Henry Owen, his mother and sister, joined the Church
      just prior to this siege of hatred and massacre, which finally
      drove the Saints from the confines of that unfriendly region,
      They suffered and endured those terrible wrongs along with
      their brethren and sisters. They remained with the body of
      the Saints and joined with them in the great exodus
      westward in 1847.
      It is necessary to digress at this juncture, that the events
      which converge in the progress of this narrative may be
      briefly reviewed, for without them the life story of John
      Henry Wilcox will not be complete.
      In the year 1837, Parley P. Pratt, the great Latter-day
      Apostle of Mormonism, went on his first mission to Canada
      and in due time visited Whitby, Upper Canada. Here he met
      the family of Thomas Young and later his son, James Young
      and family.
      The gospel message so beautifully unfolded to those eager
      listeners, sank deep into their hearts and filled their souls
      with a great peace and security like one who has found the
      way home and sees the gate swinging open to admit them
      to all its joy and blessings.
      James Young and family were baptized by Alma Babbitt, a
      traveling elder, in the vicinity of their home.
      Converts to the church in those days were eager to emigrate
      to Zion where they might live the gospel and mingle with the
      Saints as the Lord required. That was a day of sacrifice,
      obedience, and consecrations, of all things earthly to a great
      overshadowing faith, which illuminated the pathway to the
      promised land, and on through the waters of tribulation, that
      later surged about them like a tempest at sea lashing the
      defenseless driftwood along the shore.
      Mary Young, daughter of James and Elizabeth Seely Young,
      had just celebrated her seventh birthday, which occurred on
      June 6, 1831, when her parents, together with a group of
      converts, took leave of their homeland and former friends,
      bound for the gathering place of the Saints of Independence,
      Missouri.
      They arrived at Toronto, Canada, where they rested for a
      few days, making preparations for their onward journey by
      boat.
      Here a very remarkable incident occurred. Thomas and
      James Young were expert sailors, accustomed to the
      rigorous work of that profession. James especially was
      famous for his great strength. Indeed, he was a modern
      Sampson.
      One day while at work in the ports of Lake Erie, he lifted a
      ships anchor weighing 1,125 pounds, into midair unaided in
      any way. This amazing feat is not hearsay, but is recorded
      in the Naval History of Canada.
      Under the protection of these worthy seamen, the party
      boarded a steamer at Toronto, crossed Lake Erie into the
      Erie Canal, and sailed down the Ohio River, landing at
      Sharidon, Missouri, about December 15,1838, just at the
      height of that fiendish crusade waged against the Prophet
      Joseph Smith and his followers ,already started.
      Their reception in Zion was surely contrary to what they
      expected. The great Latter-day Prophet was there, his work
      was there, and his people were gathering to this chosen land
      to establish the work of the Lord as He had directed, but
      Satan was also there moving the power of the earth and the
      infernal regions to dispose and destroy the great Latter-day
      work, and trample its glorious principles in the dust, and
      slaughter its adherents.
      When the Canadian Saints arrived at Sharidon, a mob had
      gathered there to greet them, with a request for them to
      leave the state within four hours. If they failed to obey,
      they would be shot and their effects burned.
      This hostile, malicious command to those weary travelers
      and homeless, unwelcome strangers must have cut the very
      earth from beneath their feet and left them confused and
      bewildered. But the order to leave must be carried out.
      Fortunately, they secured transportation on a steamer
      making its last trip up the Mississippi River.
      The weather was extremely cold, but the ship sailed on
      safely during the night. Next morning, however, things
      were a bit different. Their boat running at high speed struck
      a snag, which ripped it from stem to stern.
      Life boats were lowered and the passengers landed safely on
      the Iowa side of the river. Thankful, indeed, were these
      mistreated exiles to find a resting place beyond the reach of
      the mob, at least for the season.
      During the year 1838, 15,000 Saints were driven from
      Missouri. Most of them settled in Illinois. The Young family,
      however, settled at Burlington, Iowa, where they resided
      seven years.
      The Saints were extremely poor at this time. They had been
      beaten, driven and robbed, but not conquered or defeated,
      for out of another wilderness rose the beautiful city of
      Nauvoo, and from the faith and united efforts of a united
      people rose the parapets of a holy temple, shedding forth
      their glorious light upon the new day dawning for all the
      inhabitants of the earth.
      These credentials should have been a worthy passport to
      any community or state, but on the contrary, it only fed the
      flame of jealousy and hatred with which all inferior minds
      are affected, and swung the pendulum of their ungodly
      wrath back to the dungeons where the wicked plot death
      and violence.
      Here, no doubt, the sinister design to annihilate Mormonism
      was renewed and its efforts increased, like the wicked Jews
      of 2000 years ago. They never rested until their purpose
      seemed fully accomplished.
      Mary Young and John Henry Wilcox, whose story we shall
      follow henceforth, saw these things, lived through them
      witnessed the forces of evil raging against the powers of
      righteousness, heard the cries of sorrow and mourning,
      listened to the voice of inspiration and rejoiced when the
      great pilgrimage to the West was resumed in 1847. They
      were among the first to leave on that unparalleled march.
      It will be remembered that President Brigham Young and his
      associates started upon the expedition during the spring of
      1846, but the enlistment of the famous Mormon Battalion in
      June of that year so reduced their numbers and strength
      that the undertaking was postponed until the following
      Spring, and the homeless travelers settled in a place they
      called Winter Quarters, where they camped during the
      winter.
      Here Mary Young, with her parents and John Henry Wilcox,
      his mother and sister’s family took part in the busy days
      that followed, for, indeed, that rugged prairie camp hummed
      with activity.
      Early and late the ringing anvils sent their rhythmic music
      resounding over the plains, for wagons must be constructed
      and repaired, barrels made for water, tool boxes, food
      boxes, and a thousand and one things so indispensable for
      the hard journey of a pioneer. Women and children were
      feverishly sewing up tents, patching old garments now so
      thin and worn, mending shoes and frayed coats against the
      day of their long anticipated journey to a place of peace and
      rest.
      How inadequate their supply of even the necessities of life
      must have been, and how stinted the hours of relaxation
      and ease, but with all, they worked with a will and beneath
      their shabby jackets, a song of hope was in their hearts and
      the vision of the promised land lightened the long, strenuous
      hours of labor and touched the blacksmiths’ bellows, the
      carpenters’ benches and the flying needles with a deeper
      meaning.
      Those master strokes for freedom, so dear to every human
      heart, was music in their ears, and the sting of privation lost
      its pain and torment.
      [Insert by Pauline Edgley: In spite of this writer’s hopeful
      tone, let it be noted that the Young family , as one of many,
      suffered greatly that winter as they prepared for the trek
      West. The records show that Mary was at the tenderhearted
      age of 15 when she lost two little sisters and a baby
      brother at Madison, Iowa, their Winter Quarters. Mehhetable
      Young had just turned 7 when she died on December 1,
      1846. Just 3 weeks later, little Martha, who was almost 2,
      passed away. Mother Elizabeth was pregnant during this
      horrible time. Her baby, Ephraim, was born in March 1847,
      and lived only a week. How did they stand it? The remaining
      children were John, 17, Mary 15, Anna 14, who later died at
      age 19, Sarah 12, Elizabeth 9, and Hannah 4.]
      It was here at Winter Quarters, amid the strenuous day of
      preparation that John Henry Wilcox and Mary Young first
      met, and where, no doubt, the little imp of romance first
      found them. Mary was a vivacious young miss of fifteen and
      John Henry was a sturdy, dashing youth of 23.
      In those days, love making was generally a short, accurate
      method of sure winning, and Mary and John soon decided
      that they were intended for each other and kept that fact in
      mind ever after.
      Soon the balmy spring days of 1847 arrived and on April 7,
      the first division of pioneers moved out of Winter Quarters,
      and a month later on May 7th, the second company
      followed, and lo and behold, Mary and John were listed as
      co-travelers. No doubt a little arrangement of their own.
      Could anything be finer or more appropriate than this. It
      was the beginning of a deep abiding love for each other and
      the desperate struggle and trials of the long journey ahead
      would be made easier to bear by their occasional meetings,
      so important and so delightful to young lovers. The evening
      campfire around which the tired pilgrims gathered for
      relaxation and pleasure gave them further opportunity of
      meeting and taking part in the Virginia Reel, and singing
      the songs of Zion, with only the echoing hills, the towering
      pines, and the startled coyotes for an audience.
      These concerts of the desert were simple in their rendition
      perhaps, but they were the expression of praise and
      gratitude, and an appeal for guidance and protection as they
      wended their way to valley land of the West, now waiting to
      receive them.
      Their mode of travel was by ox teams. Those sleepy,
      clumsy creatures were often contrary and needed constant
      urging and guidance.
      Mary was then a mere slip of a girl, but her energy, selfreliance
      and ready wit won the attention of Captain Hunter.
      She seemed to know just how to crack the whip to waken
      the dreamy, old ox that shirked his duty and keep him
      moving right along.
      Ability in the line of endeavor is sure to win recognition, and
      soon Mary was in command of three yoke of oxen and the
      heavily loaded wagons behind them. The task of yoking and
      unyoking them each day became her pleasure and the
      amazing strength and courage to walk beside them the
      entire distance from Winter Quarters to Salt Lake Valley was
      her greatest accomplishment.
      The startling compliment paid to her by Captain Hunter
      when he said, “Mary, you are worth more than all my
      drivers,” was well deserved, and she remembered them as
      long as she lived.
      Nearly five months of ceaseless travel over rocks, brambles
      and parching prairies, through dust and mud and rushing
      rivers, exposure to all kinds of weather with insufficient food
      and clothing, evading the buffalo herds, escaping the Indian
      raids, nursing the sick, burying the dead as they blazed a
      trail of one thousand miles step by step, all for a religious
      belief, must ever remain the marvelous undertaking in
      recorded history.
      At length, the brown, rolling plains and desert wastes over
      which they passed stretched away to the eastward, and was
      lost in the fading light of the unpleasant past.
      The soft, serene days of September were now at hand. The
      towering Rockies were bathed in the golden sunset, when
      the little band of worn-out wanderers crept through the deep
      gorges of Echo Canyon and down into the broad, smiling
      valley below, now waiting to receive them with all its barren
      beauty, its solitude and promise.
      A location on which to build a new home now became their
      first concern, and once again a little log cabin peeped out
      above the tall sagebrush like cat tails among the rushes,
      small they were and crude, but within, the spirit of rest and
      security from mobs and plunder must have been sweet,
      indeed.
      Everyone was busy preparing for the on-coming winter.
      John Henry and Mary saw each other frequently, and kept
      the bud of romance growing sweet and tender until the
      following March, when it came into full bloom, on the 14th of
      that blustery, unruly harbinger of spring.
      They were married by William S. Seely, and have the
      distinction of being the first [white] couple to marry in the
      State of Utah.
      This honor was recognized by President Brigham Young in
      the form of a wedding present of ten acres of land in the
      vicinity of the present Sugarhouse Ward.
      The time had come for them to build their own cabin home.
      John Henry was an experienced workman and soon a tallow
      candle flickered in the tiny window, which Mary curtained
      with ruffled calico and set her house in order in true pioneer
      fashion.
      Outside her door the Sego Lily, Indian Paint Brush, the
      Bluebell and wild daisies nodded a welcome to their
      charming friends and companions.
      This picture of pastoral beauty, made sacred by the faith
      and love of its makers, was the first home of the Wilcox
      families in the west. Here a vigorous branch of that great
      parental tree was to take its place in the forest of human
      endeavor and carve their name, deep in the structure of a
      mighty commonwealth.
      John Henry and Mary were well suited to each other, both by
      temperament and training. They had been tutored by the
      same teacher in the same school of experience. They had
      witnessed the consuming desolation of evil and now they
      were enjoying the unspeakable bliss of quiet and safety.
      They had been comrades in adversity, now they were united
      and happy. True, they had their differences. All women beg
      to differ with their husbands, but in the big things of life
      they were one.
      A verification of the latter statement was very noticeable a
      year after their marriage when the christening time of their
      firstborn was announced, three weeks after his birth, which
      took place on February 15, 1849.
      It was John Henry’s wish that he be given the name of
      Hazard, in honor of his great grandfather of Revolutionary
      fame, and Mary consented without a question.
      It is interesting to note that the name Hazard was the
      maiden name of three sisters, Mary, Martha, and Hannah,
      who married into the Wilcox family and because of this
      unusual event, Hazard was chosen as a given name from
      generation to generation down to the present time. Hence,
      that favorite name appears so frequently in the Wilcox
      genealogy.
      When Hazard the 7th was two years old, his parents were
      called to help settle Manti in Sanpete County. Here John
      Henry obtained a lot, built a one room house on it, and
      began life anew. The prospects for making a living were
      anything but encouraging, for the season was exceptionally
      dry and the water supply uncertain, but he had answered
      the call of authority and would make the best of the
      situation.
      They went to Manti early in the spring of 1851, and following
      July the 13th, their daughter Elizabeth was born, and the
      little home in the wilderness was made happy in spite of its
      deficiencies in comfort and conveniences. These privations
      were the common lot of all pioneers, but the fact that
      Elizabeth was the first white child born in Sanpete County is
      an item of history which belongs exclusively to the life story
      of John Henry and Mary Wilcox. This rare distinction comes
      to but very few people, but Elizabeth is the rightful heir to
      that honor which is shared generally by the entire family.
      Just how the people there managed to provide food and
      clothing and other necessities, isolated as they were in a
      sagebrush wilderness, is hard to imagine as we look back
      from the swift moving methods of production of today, and
      yet we know that stern necessity compelled them to be both
      frugal and resourceful and that their careful methods of
      utilizing the uncultivated products of nature was the secret
      of their success.
      John Henry did his best to make a livelihood for his loved
      ones by every available means, but the opportunities were
      few. Indeed, at one time he found employment at a saw
      mill located in Pleasant Creek Canyon, twenty miles to the
      north, taking his ox team and cows along to feed on the fine
      mountain ranges while he worked, and thus save the
      expense of feeding them at home.
      All went well for a time, and then one day he discovered that
      the Indians had driven his cattle away, burned his wagon
      and all its contents, leaving him stranded and somewhat
      discouraged, for the future looked even darker than before.
      At length he made his way home and soon after moved his
      family into the fort, where he received help and protection.
      Here in the fort, surrounded by the same primitive
      conditions and frontier hardships, their second daughter,
      Sarah, was born on August 1, 1853. Once again their
      humble dwelling was made happy, for everyone was safe
      and well and that was the most important thing after all.
      Each year the outlook for better times became a little worse,
      and finally the combined calamities of draught, crop failures,
      and danger from Indian raids, forced them to find a home
      elsewhere.
      Five years of continual struggle had now passed away. The
      house they built upon their arrival there and a few pieces of
      furniture were their only possessions, and these they
      exchanged for a yoke of oxen and another covered wagon,
      and when the spring time of 1855 came around, John Henry
      and Mary were again guiding their steeds of long ago back
      over the same rugged trail they knew so well, in true
      pioneer fashion.
      They selected North Ogden for their future home. Here they
      believed the opportunities for making a living were perhaps
      more favorable.
      They reached their destination in the early part of May and
      set up housekeeping with high hopes for better days to
      come.
      Just how they fared and by what means they earned their
      daily bread is not known exactly, but they were equal to any
      occasion under any and all circumstances.
      The birth of their son, James Henry, on November 10th of
      that year [1855] was the most important day of their
      sojourn in that locality.
      Some unforeseen obstacles must have arisen, which caused
      them to terminate their residence there rather suddenly, for
      the summer of 1856 found them living comfortably at
      Pleasant Grove, Utah, repeating the same harsh experiences
      with unfavorable climatic drawbacks and prevailing
      difficulties as before but undaunted in their determination to
      win their way and surmount all barriers, for that was the lot
      of a pioneer.
      During their residence at Pleasant Grove, another son was
      born to them on March 13, 1858. The name given to him is
      John Carlos and is so recorded in the chronicles of his
      fathers.
      Five lovely children were the only riches they had gathered
      during their travels thus far, but they were exceedingly
      happy as they set out upon their journey back into the same
      valley from which they had so recently departed.
      This time the vast sagebrush stretches of Mt. Pleasant was
      selected as the most promising location for the future
      farmer, that had been the object of his long search and at
      last his ambitions were realized.
      They reached Mt. Pleasant about the middle of March, 1860.
      The first settlers, who came the year before, received them
      kindly and assisted them in the selection of a suitable
      section of land, and in many other ways as well.
      In due process of time, John Henry filed claim to an 80 acre
      farm in the north fields, adjacent to the turbulent, rushing
      stream called Pleasant Creek.
      As soon as possible he built a good home, also in the
      northern part of the village and here the family was to begin
      its fifth venture in the art of pioneering.
      For 13 long years they had lived in a wilderness, for John
      Henry and Mary had been pioneers of Salt Lake Valley,
      Manti, North Ogden, Pleasant Grove, and now Mt. Pleasant.
      As we follow the migrations of this wonderful couple,we are
      led to believe that this was the spot where providence
      intended them to dwell and cease from their wanderings and
      lay the foundation stones of the house of Wilcox which was
      later to be reared in the mountain tops of Ephriam by the
      future builders who bear their name, and the future proved
      this assumption to be true.
      Soon after their arrival their daughter, Mary Mahetible, was
      born on November 8, 1860, making an even half dozen,
      three boys and three girls, each one adding their share of
      joy and importance to the new found home.
      Life for all now continued much the same as before, for the
      new country must be made to yield its rugged contour to the
      plow and harrow; rushing streams must be harnessed and
      directed over the planted fields; bridges built, roads made,
      to mention even in part the tasks that those earliest settlers
      were compelled to perform, and another colony must be
      established and another battle for existence to be waged
      and won. But this severe course of training, pitiful as it was
      at times, helped to make these, our pioneer parents, the
      wonderful people they were.
      While John Henry toiled early and late, Mary was incessantly
      busy with never ending duties, just as necessary and just as
      heroic as his.
      Besides caring for a large family, there was salaratus to
      gather for soap making, wild fruit to preserve in honey,
      wheat heads to glean, carpets to make, wool to wash, card,
      and spin ad then weave into cloth, yarn to dye, socks,
      mittens to knit and blankets to make, but the most delicate
      and intricate process of all was that of cutting and sewing
      this lovely homespun fabric into stunning creations for the
      family wardrobe, and be it remembered, they were always
      the last word in style.
      Surely, that was a day of intensive application and
      cooperation when each and all were required to carry a part
      of the heavy load which rested upon every household and
      the community at large, but by and through that, a heavy
      stream of homely duties, and unity of purpose, an abiding
      tie of brotherhood was established that was truly
      remarkable.
      March 20, 1863, is the birthday of Clarissa Jane. On that
      day she was given her place at the family fireside as number
      7, a lucky number according to the signs and calculations of
      some astrologers, but however this may be, we know that
      the new home was well on its way and that a degree of
      prosperity was near at hand, for the income from the farm
      was stable and a good proportion, and all things were
      working together for the family welfare.
      Two years later, on October 6, 1865, the march of time
      brought another daughter. Sabra Ellen was the name
      selected for her, as a mark of respect, no doubt, for her
      noted ancestor of long ago.
      It was during the year of her birth that the Black Hawk
      Indian War broke out in all its fury, and each settlement
      organized its men and boys into a unit known as Minute
      Men, who were to be ready for action at the sound of the
      drum, shoulder their muskets and march away to the scene
      of trouble wherever it might be.
      John Henry was a Minute Man and was sent all through
      Sanpete and Sevier Counties to guard and protect the lives
      and property of his people as necessity required.
      Sometimes the older boys accompanied their father, sharing
      with him grave danger and extreme hardships.
      These trips took them away from home for weeks at a time
      and the family was left to carry on the best they could, living
      in constant fear of an Indian attack. No one was safe
      anywhere, for those dusky warriors were a vicious and cruel
      foe, eager to slay their innocent victims without mercy.
      That fearful conflict continued until the year 1872. During
      that time two daughters were added to the family circle.
      Hannah on April 13, 1868, and Martha Ann, July 23, 1872,
      making a total of seven girls, a very unique occurrence in
      any one household.
      It is said that good fortune, like trouble, often comes in pairs
      and so it happened in this case, for Justus Azel was
      announced on his sister Sarah’s 23rd birthday, and thus the
      date August 1st is made to confer a double honor upon the
      house of Wilcox, the First. The exact date of his birth is
      August 1, 1874.
      The membership of this wonderful pioneer home was now
      complete, and the rosary of budding youth and maidens
      remained unbroken in the treasure chest of father and
      mother love, there to remain throughout all eternity.
      The years that followed henceforth were less strenuous and
      the parent tree was losing some of its branches according to
      the law of progression, for the children must repeat the
      story of their parents and assume their place in the great
      forests of life and work out their own destiny. It was
      because of this immutable decree that the old homestead
      was slowly descending toward its decline and final
      dissolution.
      John Henry and Mary were growing older. The morning and
      noonday of their lives had passed, and the twilight fast
      gathering about them, was serene and untroubled. This
      most desirable goal can only be reached through the
      everglades of renunciation, faith, patience and hope, a price
      exceedingly high, but it had been fully paid and their reward
      was near at hand.
      As we glance back over the years for a summary of their
      career, we find that John Henry was a medium sized man,
      with dark hair and eyes, pleasing in appearance and
      unassuming in manner. He was inclined to take life calmly
      and seriously and yet he was energetic and ambitious to
      possess the loaves and fishes of daily need in fair quantities
      and in the proper way - for honesty was one of his greatest
      virtues. To deal fairly with his fellowmen was part of his
      religious creed. Tithe paying and church donations were
      never neglected. His nature inclined to deeds of kindness,
      helpfulness, peace and good will. His philosophy of life was
      to live quietly and sincerely and be a friend to man. At
      home he was the good husband and father and the
      exemplar in all things.
      Mary was a decided brunette, above the average in weight,
      strong in body and mind, positive in her attitude toward
      right and wrong and vigorous in her methods of solving the
      problems that must be met and mastered, without quibble
      or complaint.
      On the other hand, her great generous heart and
      sympathetic understanding of human needs enabled her to
      become the refuge for the distressed, the hungry, the
      neighbor, the traveler, all were welcome.
      The Wilcox home, with its friendly atmosphere, became their
      haven of rest where the healing balm, goodness and love
      never ceased to flow.
      To be willing to minister to the comfort and well-being of
      another is one of the greatest traits of character that a
      person can possess. It is the proof of unselfishness and true
      Christianity.
      Mary was also a good manager. Her ability to steer the
      domestic ship through the stress and storm of that uncertain
      era of empire building is commendable indeed.
      It is only fair to say that the wives and mothers of that day
      are heroines of history and should be so recognized and
      acclaimed.
      Mary was a home-maker, a faithful wife, a real mother and a
      woman of great spiritual powers. She supported her
      husband in all his religious duties and planted the seeds of
      truth and righteousness in the hearts of her children.
      Mary’s early life was spent in pioneering and the privilege of
      attending school was denied her, for she could neither read
      nor write, but through her own efforts she acquired a fund of
      information that few of her day possessed, and how well her
      alert mind stored it away for instant use.
      Here, recital of the experiences, especially those connected
      with the beginning of Mormonism, was both accurate and
      intensely interesting.
      John Henry and Mary were well mated in every respect and
      harmonious in their ideas concerning the essentials of a
      useful and happy life.
      Side by side they fought its battles - hand in hand they won
      its victories. In the spirit of fortitude they met its
      disappointments and welcomed its blessings with grateful
      hearts.
      Lovingly and tenderly they reared eleven fine sons and
      daughters to manhood and womanhood, endowed them with
      moral and mental stability, self-reliance, courage to meet
      the world in honor. Not one of them was taken away. All
      were permitted to marry and raise large families of their
      own.
      This is their contribution to society, and the record of their
      well-spent lives is the legacy they left to their posterity.
      Every home has its immortal story and this is theirs, shining
      out across the darkness and confusion of this day as a
      pattern of the good life and the way of righteousness.
      How poised and steadfastly they walked in that way, even
      from the beginning to the end and how stately they
      descended the long slope of mortality to the shores of
      eternity, not in the pomp of worldly recognition, but with a
      settled faith in God and a knowledge of His will concerning
      them. The past held no undue regrets and the future could
      be nothing less than a glorious opportunity for further
      growth and progress.
      To live wisely and well is noble, to die in honor is greatness.
      These words can be truthfully written of them, and the
      achievements of their lives are a challenge to all who bear
      the name of Wilcox, and they in turn accept it and
      appreciate it in full measure.
      During the summer of 1909, John Henry began to fail
      rapidly. He had no particular disease, his active outdoor life
      had kept him unusually healthy, but the fires of the flesh
      and burned out, and on November 21, 1909, he passed
      away as quietly and peacefully as he had lived.
      Mary remained in the old home, and her daughter Sarah and
      family came to live with her. Mary enjoyed this
      companionship. It was a period of relaxation and rest, a
      time of reflection and reminiscence so delightful to

  • Sources 
    1. [S224] Ancestry Family Trees, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members.;), Database online.
      Record for Martha Anna Wilcox

    2. [S224] Ancestry Family Trees, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members.;), Database online.
      Record for John Henry Owen Wilcox

    3. [S1] Ancestry Family Trees, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members.;), Database online.
      Record for Mary Young

    4. [S1] Ancestry Family Trees, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members.;), Database online.
      Record for James Ross Young