Notes


Matches 501 to 550 of 1,203

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501 Died in Childbirth Holsing, Uranior E. (I13387)
 
502 Died in Childhood Huffman, Elijah (I7013)
 
503 Died in Infancy Mink, Alvin (I13202)
 
504 Died of a heart attack after being acquitted on the charges of treason. Plantagenet Kg, Sir Arthur 1st Viscount of Lisle (I23849)
 
505 Died of Dysentry Eaton, John (I27724)
 
506 Died of smallpox Dorchester Church Records: August 9, 1702, Samuel Butt and Sarah Butt His wife and Patience Lawrence appeared before ye Church & penitently confessed ye Sins of Fornication to ye Satisfaction of ye Church. In 1709 Samuel appears to have taken an interest in two vessels, one the "Sarah & Mary, 12 tons, and the other "Diamond", 25 tons. These vessels had been detained in port because the collector had left and there was no one to act for him. The owners petioned for the release of the vessels and Samuel Butts' name is on the list. Samuel served as deputy at the General Assembly in 1716, 1719, 1721, 1722, 1725, 1726, 1728 and 1729. Served as Selectman in 1717, being the first board of selectman of the town. Samuel apparently left no will. Inventory of his estate was taken June 23, 1747 and among the items are "To one Survaiers Compas and one Protractor one Brass Scaill & one 4 rod Chaine with one Book of ye Sur-vaies Art" valued at 10 pounds. Died of smallpox Dorchester Church Records: August 9, 1702, Samuel Butt and Sarah Butt His wife and Patience Lawrence appeared before ye Church & penitently confessed ye Sins of Fornication to ye Satisfaction of ye Church. In 1709 Samuel appears to have taken an interest in two vessels, one the "Sarah & Mary, 12 tons, and the other "Diamond", 25 tons. These vessels had been detained in port because the collector had left and there was no one to act for him. The owners petioned for the release of the vessels and Samuel Butts' name is on the list. Samuel served as deputy at the General Assembly in 1716, 1719, 1721, 1722, 1725, 1726, 1728 and 1729. Served as Selectman in 1717, being the first board of selectman of the town. Samuel apparently left no will. Inventory of his estate was taken June 23, 1747 and among the items are "To one Survaiers Compas and one Protractor one Brass Scaill & one 4 rod Chaine with one Book of ye Sur-vaies Art" valued at 10 pounds. Butts, Samuel (I3797)
 
507 Died on a farm Church, Mary (I24161)
 
508 Died on his pillow King Of Ireland, Feidimidh Rectmar The Law Giver (I18650)
 
509 Died shortly after open heart surgery Buckwalter, Martha (I12294)
 
510 Died Young Maloney, Margaret (I2852)
 
511 died young Ackeret, Herbert (I15270)
 
512 Died young Doggett, Joseph (I26508)
 
513 Diied of SIDS Walker, Billy Jr (I26555)
 
514 Dropsy age 43 Graham, James (I6461)
 
515 Drowned Simon Magnac, Jean (I26146)
 
516 drowned in Sutter Basin, Sutter Co., CA Westwood, Joseph Raymond (I18061)
 
517 Drowning Graham, Alford (I7939)
 
518 Duke of Swabia HRE Philip (I23922)
 
519 Dunkard Cemetery McKibben, William (I4180)
 
520 Durham Cathedral De Neville, 1 B. Neville of Raby Ralph (I10010)
 
521 East Union Cem. Marshall, Sarah Elizabeth (I11029)
 
522 East Union Cem;Cancer that started from a cut while shaving, it spread to the rest of his body Greenwald, Philip Jacob (I18836)
 
523 EDNA SMITH. More About EDNA SMITH: Residence: LaPuerta, CA Smith, Edna Jane (I19948)
 
524 Edward the Elder (Old English: Eadweard se Ieldra) (c.874-877 - July 17, 924) was King of England (899 - 924). He was the son of Alfred the Great (Ælfred se Greata) and became King of Wessex upon his father's death in 899. Edward arguably exceeded Alfred's military achievements, restoring the Danelaw to Saxon rule and reigning in Mercia from 918, after the death of his sister, Ethelfleda (Æðelfl?d). He spent his early reign fighting his cousin Aethelwald (Æðelwald), son of Ethelred I (Æþelræd). He died in 924 and was buried in the New Minster in Winchester, Hampshire. After the Conquest, the minster was replaced by Hyde Abbey to the north of the city and King Edward's body was transferred there. His last resting place is currently marked by a cross-inscribed stone slab within the outline of the old abbey marked out in a public park. The portrait included here is imaginary and was drawn together with portraits of other Anglo-Saxon monarchs by an unknown artist in the 18th century. [edit] Family King Edward had about fourteen children from three marriages, and may have had illegitimate children too. Edward married (although the exact status of the union is uncertain) Ecgwynn around 893, and they became the parents of Athelstan and a daughter who married King Sightric of York, but Ecgwynn was considered too lowly. When he became king in 899, Edward set Ecgwynn aside and married Aelffaed , a daughter of the ealdorman of Wiltshire. Their son was the future king, Ethelweard, and their daughter Eadgyth married Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor. There was one other son and five more daughters, including Edgiva alias Edgifu who married Charles the Simple. Edward married for a third time, about 919, to Edgiva alias Eadgifu, the daughter of the ealdorman of Kent. They had two sons, Edmund and Edred, and two daughters, one of which was Saint Edburga of Winchester. Edward became king of Wessex following the death of his illustrious father Alfred the Great in 899. His first task was to secure his throne against the challenge of his cousin Aethelwold, who seized the royal estates of Wimbourne and Christchurch. Aethelwold fled from military confrontation with Edward only to return with a fleet, and to raise an army, in the following year. In the consequent battle (902) Edward triumphed and Aethelwold was killed. The kingdom of Wessex which Edward had inherited from his father was certainly far more secure than it was thirty years earlier at the time when Danish armies were first looking to establish permanent settlements in the north and east of England, but the presence of these settlements posed a constant challenge. Alfred had begun the task of fortifying the strategic points of his kingdom which had been so successful in nullifying the Danish invasion of 892. Now Edward, in alliance with Aethelred and Aethelfleda of Mercia, continued the process. The 'Burghal Hildage', a document from the early years of Edward's reign, details the 30 or more burhs that had already been set up in Wessex and these were added to by Edward. Aethelfleda, Edward's ally and sister, was especially successful in using the strategy to build up the defenses of Mercia. At the Battle of Tettenhall in August 910, Edward defeated a Northumbrian force which had been raiding into Mercia and by 914 both Wessex and Mercia were ready to take the attack to the Danes. The combined campaign against Danelaw and its Five Boroughs of Leicester, Derby, Stamford, Nottingham and Lincoln, reached its successful conclusion in 918. In that year Aethelfleda died and her daughter was appointed her successor in Mercia. At first Edward accepted the situation but after a year he seized the girl and ruled Mercia directly, thus ending the independence of the once powerful Mercian kingdom. Edward was now ruler of all of the English and Danish peoples south of the Humber and, although he did nothing in 919 to stop the Danish kingdom of York falling to Ragnald, a Viking from the Norse kingdom of Dublin, he was recognised as overlord by all of the other significant kings of Britain (920). Edward died on 17 July 924; he was succeeded by his son Athelstan. Elder, K of England Edward The (I21329)
 
525 Edward was married prior. His wife and baby died in influenza outbreak after WWI Akins, Edward Paul (I21886)
 
526 Edward was the youngest son of Edward I and Eleanor of Castile, but he was the only son to live longer than his father. He was born in 1284 at Caernarvon Castle only a year after the castle's construction was begun. Edward may have been a lonely child as his father was always away fighting the Welsh, Scottish or French and his mother died when he was only young. His elder brothers had died before he was born and his sisters were married while they were young so Edward was on his own. This may explain the importance with which he regarded his friends. Edward I died on 7th July 1307 on the way to Scotland to conquer Robert the Bruce. The old King's dying request was that his son should carry his bones with him in battle until Robert was defeated, but Edward II had other ideas. No taste for royal duties Edward left Robert Bruce alone in the north and returned to London and to his friends. It seems that Edward II had no time for his royal duties. He preferred to spend time with Piers Gaveston who was a handsome Knight and Edward's companion since childhood. Gaveston was showered gifts and when Edward left for France in early 1308 to marry Isabella, the daughter of Philippe IV of France, Gaveston was left as Regent in charge of affairs in England. Piers Gaveston Gaveston had arranged the celebrations for Edward and his new Queen on their return to England, but there were problems with the arrangements and Edward spent more time with Gaveston than Isabella at the festivities. This troubled the new Queen and her attendants. It also troubled Parliament who decided that Gaveston was not fit for the elevated position that Edward had given to him, and told Edward to dismiss his favourite knight. In June of 1308, Gaveston was given the role of Lieutenant of Ireland and he left England, but he had returned by the middle of 1309. A group of 21 lords were elected in agreement with Edward to oversee the management of Edward's affairs. They were known as the 'Lords Ordainers' and their most powerful member was Thomas, Earl of Lancaster. In August 1311, the Ordainers received permission from parliament to dismiss Gaveston and take control of Edwards affairs completely. Gaveston left the country in November, but was back at Edward's side by Christmas. The Lords declared war on their king in early 1312 and Edward with Gaveston moved to York to prepare for civil war. The barons found Gaveston at Scarborough Castle in May and although he was promised safe passage if he surrendered, Gaveston was taken to Warwick Castle and then executed on June 19 by the Earls of Lancaster, Warwick, Arundel and Hereford. Scotland Since the death of his father, Edward had neglected the problem with the Scots. He had ventured briefly into Scotland in 1310, but gained nothing. Robert the Bruce had used the time to strengthen his position and in 1312 reclaimed most of the land in Scotland taken by the English. In June 1313 Bruce besieged Stirling Castle, the only castle left in English hands. The English governor of the castle Philippe de Mowbray came to an agreement with the Scots that if English forces had not reached the castle by midsummer 1314, Mowbray would surrender the castle to them. Bruce even let Mowbray leave the castle to inform the English king of the agreement. Edward had little choice but to prepared for war and called for an army to meet him at Berwick in June of 1314. Edward had collected a large army, double the size of the Scots'. The two armies met on June 24, Midsummer Day at the Bannock Burn where the Scots had prepared traps for the English troops. The English were defeated but Edward managed to escape to Berwick and then back to London. Terrible years The years 1315, 1316, 1317 and half of 1318 were extremely bad for Edward and England. Edward lost control of the country to the Ordainers lead by the Earl of Lancaster and very heavy rain across Europe destroyed crops for several years in a row. Robert the Bruce was unopposed in the north and captured Berwick and invaded Ireland. On Edward's side was Hugh Despenser (the younger). The two sides were reconciled by the Treaty of Leake in August of 1318 arranged by the 'Middle Party' lead by the Earl of Pembroke. A unified King and Ordainers combined their forces and marched north to regain Berwick from the Scots. While they besieged the town in June/July of 1319, a group of Scots invaded Yorkshire and defeated an army under the control of the Archbishop of York. Edward had to abandon the siege and return to deal with the Scots in Yorkshire (truce agreed?). Hugh Despenser the Younger Hugh Despenser the Younger and his father became Edward's new favourites at court and like Gaveston before them were richly rewarded by Edward. Hugh was given the title of Lord of Glamorgan and began to upset the Marcher Lords by obtaining their land in South Wales. The most powerful Marcher Loer was Roger Mortimer who sided with Lancaster against the king. In August 1321 the Marcher Lords with the help of Lancaster ensured that the Despensers were banished. The banishment did not last long and by January 1322, the Despensers were back. 1322 was the turning point for Edward when he first captured Roger Mortimer, sending him to the Tower of London and then the Earl of Lancaster was defeated at the Battle Boroughbridge. Lancaster was beheaded on March 22, 1322. Edward finally had his revenge for the murder of Gaveston ten years earlier. Isabella, the 'she-wolf of France' Following the death of Lancaster and the imprisonment of Roger Mortimer, Edward's new problem was his wife. Isabella may not have been very close to her husband especially when he had shown more interest in Gaveston and the Despensers. She started to openly oppose her husband and the Despensers and may have been visiting Mortimer in the Tower. Mortimer managed to escape from the Tower at the end of 1323 and he took a ship to France. In 1324, The French king Charles IV invaded Gascony and Isabella, as the king's brother, asked to go to France to negotiate a peace. When Isabella reached France in 1325 it emerged that she had another agenda. She met up with Roger Mortimer and together they began to plot how to overthrow Edward and the Despensers. Isabella also managed to capture her own son, Edward (III) who had travelled to France to pay homage to the French king. The French king was not happy with his sister's actions and she had to go to Hainault where she managed to recuit an army. Isabella arranged the marriage of Edward (III) to Philippa, the daughter of the Count of Hainault. Isabella and Mortimer landed in England in September of 1326. Edward had little support in England and had to retreat to Wales. Edward and the Despensers were captured at the end of 1326, the Despensers being executed for treason. The Barons confirmed that Edward (III) should become the keeper of the realm and in January 1326, Edward II abdicated in favour of his son. Aware that Edward II still could pose a threat to them, Isabella and Mortimer had the old king murdered at Berkeley Castle. Edward, K of England Ii (I21126)
 
527 Edwardsville Cemetery Padgett, Maria (I11734)
 
528 Edwardsville Cemetery Tann, William Hosea (I11737)
 
529 Ela, only child of William, 2nd Earl of Salisbury, from whom she inherited large estates in Wiltshire, was born at Amesbury. The estates, including Chitterne, had been given to Ela's great-great- great-grandfather, Walter, by William the Conqueror after the defeat of King Harold, when English lands were taken from their previous Saxon owners and redistributed amongst the new Norman hierarchy. Ela's grandfather, Patrick, constable of Salisbury, was created Earl of Salisbury in 1149 by Empress Matilda whose steward of the household he was. Ela's father, William, succeeded to the title and estates in 1168 upon the death of Patrick, who died whilst returning from a crusade. William was a captain in the King's army in Normandy in 1195 and keeper of the charter for licensing tournaments. At her father's death in 1196, Ela succeeded to the title and estates, but here her story becomes blurred. According to Canner, she was: "secretly taken to Normandy by her relations and there brought up in close and secret custody.....An english knight, named William Talbot, undertook to discover the place of the youthful heiress's concealment.... Talbot dressed as a pilgrim, went to Normandy, and after wandering to and fro for two years, at length found the Lady Ela of Salisbury. He then exchanged his pilgrim's dress for that of a Harper or travelling Troubadour, and in this disguise entered the Court in which the maid was detained. As he acted his part well he was kindly received and treated as one of the household. At last after two years of search his undertaking was fully accomplished and having found a convenient opportunity for returning to England brought the young heiress with him and presented her to King Richard..... Ela, countess of Salisbury in her own right, then became the wife of William Longespee, son of Henry II". However, CFJ Hankinson (editor of Debrett's Peerage) writes thus: "...he (Ela's father) died in 1196. His only child, Ela, (third holder), married at the age of eight William de Longespee (illegitimate son of Henry II by Rosamund Clifford**) who thereupon became earl of Salisbury in her right." Clearly Ela could not have spent several years in Normandy after her father's death and still have married William de Longespee at the age of eight, unless her year of birth (only provided by Canner) is wrong. All agree that Ela was a woman of strong character. She and William each laid a foundation stone of the new Salisbury Cathedral. During one of his long journeys abroad, when others feared he had been lost, she refused to marry any of the suitors who had their eye on her fortune and steadfastly believed in her vision of his return. She was proved correct. On his death, William was the first to be buried in the Cathedral and his fine tomb stands in the nave. Ela founded two religious houses in his memory, one for men at Hinton Charterhouse and the other for women at Lacock. It is said that she laid the foundation stones for both on the same day, 16 April 1232, requiring a journey of 16 miles. She bore her husband eight children, four girls and four boys. Her eldest son, William, who donated his lands at Chitterne to the Abbey, was later killed on a crusade and also has a tomb in Salisbury Cathedral. Her youngest son, Nicholas, became Bishop of Salisbury (1292 - 1297) and his heart was buried at Lacock, his body at Salisbury. The photo right shows Nicholas' marble heartstone, inscribed with ecclesiastical regalia, which is on display at Lacock Abbey. One of Ela's daughters visited the convent in 1287 and two of her granddaughters became nuns there. Ela joined Lacock Abbey as a nun in 1238, and in 1241 became it's first abbess, it had started with fifteen nuns under a prioress. She was abbess for fifteen years and died at seventy-five in 1261. She was buried in the choir of the Abbey church before the High Altar. Upon the demolitionof the church her tombstone was moved to the cloister walk and from there in 1895 to it's present position in the centre of the Cloister Court. It's inscription, which may date from the eighteenth century reads (latin translation): Below lie buried the bones of the venerable Ela, who gave this sacred house as a home for the nuns. She also lived here as holy abbess and countess of Salisbury, full of good works. During her time Ela had obtained many rights for the Abbey and the village of Lacock. She was also Sheriff of Wiltshire for two years following her husband's death, the only woman sheriff Wiltshire had until Lady Hawley in 1998. Salisbury, Ela Countess of (I19997)
 
530 Eleanor's second husband - no children Field, Eugene Jr. (I20575)
 
531 Electronic Army Serial Number Merged File, 1938-1946 [Archival Database]; ARC: 1263923. World War II Army Enlistment Records; Records of the National Archives and Records Administration, Record Group 64; National Archives at College Park. College Park, Maryland, U.S.A. Source (S87)
 
532 Elizabeth de Beauchamp1 Elizabeth de Beauchamp||p3200.htm#i31996|Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick||p3204.htm#i32039|Alice de Toni||p3206.htm#i32051|William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick|b. 1237\nd. 1298|p2648.htm#i26478|Maud FitzGeoffrey||p24461.htm#i244610|Ralph V. de Toni||p3211.htm#i32102 Elizabeth de Beauchamp is the daughter of Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick and Alice de Toni.1 She married Thomas of Astley, 3rd Lord Astley, son of Sir Giles of Astley and Alice Wolvey, before 1336/37.1 Child of Elizabeth de Beauchamp and Thomas of Astley, 3rd Lord Astley William of Astley, 4th Lord Astley+ b. b 1344, d. a 13701 Citations [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 283. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage. Online source: thepeerage.com Elizabeth De Beauchamp (I861)
 
533 Elizabeth gave birth to a girl and named her Katherine. She was born and died on 2 February 1503. Succumbing to a post-partum infection, Elizabeth died on 11 February, her 37th birthday. Plantagenet, Princess Elizabeth of York Queen Consort of England (I22573)
 
534 ELIZABETH JANE BELL

Elizabeth Jane Bell died at the home of her niece, Mrs. D. B. McConnell, Falls Creek, of a complication of disease after a three and half weeks illness.

Miss Bell, the daughter of John and Sarah Bell, was born in Westmoreland county, Pa., Aug. 9, 1843, and died Wednesday, October 14, 1925.

She is survived by the following brothers and sisters: John W. Bell, of Lakin, Kan.; Sarah Williams, of Warsaw, Pa. and A. L. Bell of Ridgway.

She was a member of the Presbyterian church of DuBois, Pa.

The funeral was held Friday, Oct. 16, 1925, Rev. T. S. Cochart, of DuBois, conducting the services and interment was made at Temple cemetery. 
Bell, Elizabeth Jane (I28737)
 
535 Ella R. Eaton, 70, died at the Sheridan County Memorial hospital Sunday noon, following a brief illness.
Mrs. Eaton was a resident of Sheridan for the past 24 years and was a member of the Methodist church.
She is survived by seven daughters, Mrs. L. W. Farley, Belgrade, Mo, Mrs. S. A. Maxwell of Sheridan, Mrs. A. J. Pierce, Ranchester, Mrs. C. G. Whitchurch, Dayton, Mrs. L. A. Goforth, Banner, Mrs. T. R. David, Kaycee, and Mrs. G. B. Redman of Mayoworth; one son, J. G. Eaton of Clinton, Okla; a sister, Mrs. T. G. Mitchell of Bome Teere, Mo. and a brother, Wesley Sutton of Missouri.
Her husband preceded her in death in 1928.
Funeral services will be held Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 from the Champion Drawing room with the Rev. Charles E. Hardesty officiating.

SHERIDAN PRESS - Jan. 28, 1936

Obit provided by Karylyn Petrie

Plot owned by George C. Ball as stated in cemetery records. 
Sutton, Roseane Ellen (I14527)
 
536 Ellsberry, Elizabeth Prather, comp. <i>Cemetery Records of New London County, Connecticut</i>. <i>Vol. I-II.</i> Chillicothe, MO, USA: Elizabeth Prather Ellsberry, 1968. Source (S258)
 
537 Ellsberry, Elizabeth Prather, comp., Cemetery Records of New London County, Connecticut, Chillicothe, MO, USA: Elizabeth Prather Ellsberry, 1968 Source (S56)
 
538 Elmwood Cemetery, Fruita, Mesa, Colorado, United States Anderson, Carl Brook (I29440)
 
539 email address: grondzio@comcast.net Grondiziowski, Peter Michael Jr (I28)
 
540 Emigrated: April 18, 1849, Ship "Ashland" to New Orleans Ships List #200161 Welks, Elizabeth (I23128)
 
541 Emigrated: April 18, 1849, Ship "Ashland" to New Orleans Ships List #200161 Name (Facts Page): She may be the Elizabeth mentioned in the info fm Wm Hurst family Hurst, Betsy Ann (I13981)
 
542 Emigrated: April 18, 1849, Ship "Ashland" to New Orleans Ships List #200161 Residence: Riverside, UT Hurst, Phillip (I13985)
 
543 Emigrated: April 1849, ship "Ashland" to New Orleans Ships List #200161 Westwood, Elizabeth (I24401)
 
544 Emigrated: April 1849, ship "Ashland" to New Orleans Ships List #200161 Westwood, Elizabeth (I25288)
 
545 Emigrated: April 1849, ship "Ashland" to New Orleans Ships List #200161 Parentage: needs verification Hurst, Susan (I13988)
 
546 Emma BROWN Birth Date: 26 Aug 1892 Death Date: Nov 1980 Social Security Number: 442-64-9458 State or Territory Where Number Was Issued: Oklahoma Death Residence Localities ZIP Code: 74063 Localities: Lotsee, Tulsa, Oklahoma Sand Springs, Tulsa, Oklahoma don't think this is her- but maybe Emma BROWN Birth Date: 26 Aug 1892 Death Date: Nov 1980 Social Security Number: 442-64-9458 State or Territory Where Number Was Issued: Oklahoma Death Residence Localities ZIP Code: 74063 Localities: Lotsee, Tulsa, Oklahoma Sand Springs, Tulsa, Oklahoma don't think this is her- but maybe Brown, Emma Augusta (I23965)
 
547 Enlisted in Co. D, 151st New York Infantry on October 22nd 1862. Discharged on June 26th 1865 near Washington, D.C.

Inscription:
76y
Co. D 151st Reg N.Y.V. Inf

Note: birth year estimated from age at death 
Monroe, Rial Willis (I9170)
 
548 Eomer From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search For a fictional Tolkien character, see Éomer. Eomer (Old English: ?om?r), also spelt Eomær, was (according to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle) the great-great-grandfather of Creoda, the first King of Mercia. He is considered the ancestor to the Kings of Mercia. Eomer himself was the son of Angeltheow. Eomer's son was Icel. He is mentioned in lines 1958-1963 of the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf as the son of Offa of Angel and grandson of Garmund. Angles Mercia, Eomer Eomaer Last King of The (I7482)
 
549 Estimated Birth Date, 1850 United States Federal Census Beam, John (I25535)
 
550 Estimated Birthdate Beam, Jacob (I18855)
 

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