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Matches 51 to 100 of 1,203

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51 <p>Roser, Susan E. <i>Mayflower Births and Deaths: From the Files of George Ernest Bowman at the Massachusetts Society of Mayflower Descendants</i>. Volumes 1 & 2. Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 1992.</p> Source (S151)
 
52 <p>Society of Mayflower Descendants in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Applications for Membership. Microfilm. Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.</p> Source (S197)
 
53 <p>United States, Selective Service System. <i>Selective Service Registration Cards, World War II: Fourth Registration</i>. Records of the Selective Service System, Record Group Number 147. National Archives and Records Administration. </p> <p><a href="/search/dbextra.aspx?dbid=1002">Full Source Citation</a>.</p> Source (S152)
 
54 <p>Washington State Department of Health. <i>State Death Records Index, 1940-1996.</i> Microfilm. Washington State Archives, Olympia, Washington.</p> Source (S244)
 
55 <ul><i>Returns From U.S. Military Posts, 1800-1916</i>; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M617, 1,550 rolls); Records of the Adjutant General’s Office, 1780’s-1917, Record Group 94; National Archives, Washington, D.C..</ul> Source (S101)
 
56 <ul><li><i>1855 Kansas Territory Census</i>. Microfilm reel K-1. Kansas State Historical Society.</li><li><i>1856, 1857, and 1858 Kansas Territory Censuses</i>. Microfilm reel K-1. Kansas State Historical Society.</li><li><i>1859 Kansas Territory Census</i>. Microfilm reel K-1. Kansas State Historical Society.</li><li><i>1865 Kansas State Census</i>. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-8. Kansas State Historical Society.</li><li><i>1875 Kansas State Census</i>. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-20. Kansas State Historical Society.</li><li><i>1885 Kansas State Census</i>. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-146. Kansas State Historical Society.</li><li><i>1895 Kansas State Census</i>. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-169. Kansas State Historical Society.</li><li><i>1905 Kansas State Census</i>. Microfilm reels K-1 - K-181. Kansas State Historical Society.</li><li><i>1915 Kansas State Census</i>. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-271. Kansas State Historical Society.</li><li><i>1925 Kansas State Census</i>. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-177. Kansas State Historical Society.</li></ul> Source (S91)
 
57 <ul><li>Florida Department of Health. <i>Florida Marriage Index, 1927-2001.</i> Florida Department of Health, Jacksonville, Florida.</li><li>Marriages records from various counties located in county courthouses and/or on microfilm at the Family History Library.</li></ul> Source (S250)
 
58 <ul><li>North Carolina State Center for Health Statistics. <i>North Caroline Deaths, 1997-2004.</i> North Carolina State Center for Health Statistics, Raleigh, North Carolina.</li><li>North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services. <i>North Carolina Death Records, 1968-1996</i>. North Carolina Vital Records, Raleigh, North Carolina. </li><li>North Carolina Archives and Records Section. <i>North Carolina County Records, 1908-1967</i>. North Carolina State Archives, Raleigh, North Carolina.</li></ul> Source (S143)
 
59 <ul><li>Ohio. Division of Vital Statistics. <i>Death Certificates and Index, December 20, 1908-December 31, 1953.</i> State Archives Series 3094. Ohio Historical Society, Ohio.</li><li>Ohio Department of Health. <i>Index to Annual Deaths, 1958-2002.</i> Ohio Department of Health, State Vital Statistics Unit, Columbus, OH, USA.</li></ul> Source (S209)
 
60 <ul><li>Wisconsin. <i>Wisconsin State Census, 1895</i> Microfilm, 10 reels. Wisconsin Historical Society, Madison, Wisconsin.</li><li>Wisconsin. <i>Wisconsin State Census, 1905</i>. Microfilm, 44 reels. Wisconsin Historical Society, Madison, Wisconsin.</li></ul> Source (S239)
 
61 (Battle of Weir, of Clontare) Turlough (I2239)
 
62 (Battle of Weir, of Clontare) Mudchadh (I8783)
 
63 (Battle of Weir, of Clontare) Boru, Mon. of Ireland Brian (I12463)
 
64 (Buried in Connecticut) Clark, Captain Daniel David (I25473)
 
65 (Husband of Mary Jane Saylor) OBITUARY for ISAIAH S. BARKEY ISAIAH S. BARKEY of Port Royal, has been sadly afflicted by reason of the illness of Mr. Barkey and his eldest son Emory. Faithful attendance of physicians, tender nursing and most watchful care on the part of the members of the family as well as kind friends failed to work a restoration in the case of either father or son. At a few minutes past two o'clock on Wednesday morning [21 Oct 1885] the pure spirit of EMORY BARKEY winged its way to the God who gave it. On the 4th of October, Emory returned home from Philadelphia, where he had been engaged in working at his trade as a plasterer, for several weeks previous, and being quite sick when he reached here it is thought he contracted the disease, typhoid fever, in the city, continuing to grow worse until death relieved him of his sufferings. The funeral occurred at 2 o'clock on Thursday afternoon. The solemn services were conducted by Rev. F. Adams, pastor of the Port Royal M. E. church, and the scene was extremely sad and heartrending. The son and brother dead, who bid so fair for long life, idolized by his parents, brothers and sisters, who was about to be bourne to the silent city, while the loving husband, the kind and indulgent father was momentarily expecting the summons to depart this life, being fully conscious of his approaching dissolution, for in response to the question whether he desired his wife to go to the funeral of their son or remain at his bedside, he said, "go, mother, but don't stay away long for I may not be here when you return. The husband and father Mr. Isaiah Barkey, exchanged the cares of earth for the bliss of heaven at 8:30 o'clock on Thursday evening, October 22, 1885, and was conscious almost to the last moment of his life. Mr. B. had been failing in health for several months past, but was able to pursue his trade, that of a plasterer, until a few weeks before his demise. All the medical skill could do in his behalf as well as in the case of his son Emory, was performed, but proved unavailing, his demise being caused by the failing way of vital powers. Funeral services at 1:30 o'clock P.M. on Saturday, conducted by the pastor of the deceased, Rev. F. Adams, assisted by Rev. A. H. Spangler of the Lutheran church. The remains were followed to their last resting place in Church Hill cemetery, and laid along side of the remains of his son Emory who had preceded the father to the tomb only 48 hours. Mr. Barkey was a member of Tuscarora Lodge, No. 656, I. O. O. F. and of Lieut. D. H. Wilson Post No 134, G. A. R., a large delegation of both these brothers, as well as relatives and deep sympathizing friends the remains to the cemetery. Around the open grave the members of the I. O. O. F. gathered to pay the last sad tribute of respect to the memory of a departed brother and performed the solemn funeral rites according to the ritual of the order. The G. A. R. Post also read the impressive burial service as laid down in its ritual and placed upon the casket emblems of affection and esteem for the departed brother and comrade, after which the benediction was pronounced by Rev. F. Adams. Mr. Barkey had been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for 30 years, and in his last illness he had an abiding evidence of his acceptance with God and died in the full assurance of glorious immortality. He leaves wife, two sons and two daughters, grown, who have the heartfelt sympathy of all in their overwhelming bereavement. Their cut of sorrow filled to overflowing and they all weighed down with grief, but may the God of all grace comfort and sustain them in this mysterious visitation of his providence. Burial: Old Church Hill Cemetery Turbett Township Juniata County Pennsylvania, USA Plot: Rice Section Row 3 No 19 Barkey, Isaiah Steopleton (I17317)
 
66 (In sactuary) Westminster Abbey, London, England Plantagenet, Royal Prince of England Edward V King of England (I23851)
 
67 (returning from, siege of, Damietta) D'aubigny, E of Arundel William (I5121)
 
68 (slain by the Danes) K of Dublin Donach Macmorough (I18621)
 
69 (slain) Mqs of Bavaria Leopold (I2385)
 
70 (slain) Diarmuid Mon. of Ireland (I18361)
 
71 (wd) Drake, William (I625)
 
72 (wd) Bancroft, Thomas (I10160)
 
73 (wd) Henne, Francois De (I15124)
 
74 (wp) Drake, John (I19583)
 
75 1091-1116 Sovereign Countess Almodis of La Marche (France) She succeeded father Boson II and reigned jointly with husband, Roger de Montgomery (d. 1123). Succeeded by son Boson III. Almodis C'tess of La Marche (I15137)
 
76 13709 Pasture Green Ct Clarksville, MD 21029 Thompson, George Washington (I27828)
 
77 1802? Poultney, Thomas B. (I15652)
 
78 1841 Census Returns, London, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO) Source (S21)
 
79 1844 or 1845 (per family record) Wilkinson, Salmonia (I676)
 
80 1844 or 1845 (per family record) Wilkinson, Salmonia (I676)
 
81 1850 United States Federal Census Beam, Rachel (I25539)
 
82 1860 U.S. census, population schedule. NARA microfilm publication M653, 1,438 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Source (S77)
 
83 1880 Census records John as a Farmer in Calumet County, Wisconsin I have a handwritten note written by John Mayer that reads: From Wisconsin Enough provisions for a Emigrant Car-Great Northern R.R. Disembarked at Custer Jcts, Mont. with 7 ducks, cattle, hogs, chicken, 11 or 12 children and were met by Grandfather Myer (who came to Miles City in 1882 and walked with a grin-living off the land-to Kearney, Wyo. (homesteaded-built 2 story log house.) With a 4 horse team & covered wagon-swam cattle across Yellowstone-Dick Mayer tried but Indians succeeded. Ferried household goods. All the boy friends ate them out of house & home by spring. He (Gr. Mayer) died when Daddy was about 2,3,or 4. All lived but 1- No Amanda was a sister but Bill was her husband. living are Frances & Guy-Hallie Dodge Schoonmaker-Richter(?Carl Affeldt- Aunt Jessie had arthritis MOVING WEST In 1890 Wyoming became a state. Up to that time it was a territory. There were two battles between the Indians and the Army near Fort Phil Kearny which was located along Little Piney Creek Fort Phil Kearny was one of the few stockaded forts in the west. The fort was in the middle of a vast stretch of 600 miles of Indian country between Fort Laramie and the gold fields of Montana. This location was in the very heart of the Sioux and Cheyenne's most prized hunting grounds. They would not give up their land or allow passage thru it. Nearby, two of the most bloody clashes of the Indian Wars took place. The fort was built in the summer of 1866 to keep the Bozeman Trail open. On Dec 21, 1866 The Fetterman Massacre occurred 2.8 miles NNW of the fort. A relief column of 80 men commanded by Captain William J Fetterman was decoyed and ambushed by a combined force of Sioux, Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians. The mixed force of cavalry and infantry was totally annihilated. On August 2, 1867 a company of the 27th infantry was attacked by a large force of Sioux 3.6 miles NW of the fort in what was called The Wagon Box Fight. Twenty seven soldiers along with four civilians, equipped with a new issue of Springfield breech loading rapid-fire rifles which replaced muskets, stood off a force of an estimated 3000 Sioux for three hours before a relief party arrived. The military casualties were 6 dead and 2 wounded. In 1868, Red Cloud, who was chief of the Sioux, and other Indian leaders signed a treat whereby the army would abandon Fort Phil Kearny and two other forts and leave northeastern Wyoming to the Indians. The forts were burned to the ground by the Indians as the soldiers abandoned the forts. By 1877 most Indians were removed to reservations. Problems with the Indians continued until 1890. In 1882, John Mayer, went to the Wyoming Territory with two men named Leitner and Senff to stake claims for homesteads. Their claims were along Little Piney Creek. Mayer's claim was south of the hill from the site where Fort Phil Kearny stood. Mayer's claim was the NW 1/4 of Section 35. 160 acres could be homesteaded for a filing fee of $10 and the site had to be improved and lived on for 5 years. John Mayer, Leitner and Senff returned to Wisconsin. In 1883 the three men loaded their families, furniture, stock and equipment on rented railroad emigrant cars for the trip from Wisconsin to Custer Junction, Montana, which was the end of the railroad line. From there they trailed 150 miles to their new homes. The trail trip took 10 days or more to complete. Leitners settled upstream and Senffs settled downstream from the Mayers. The site which John Mayer chose was next to the foothills of the Big Horn Mountains. There were pine, hemlock, ash, balsam, box elder, fir spruce and cottonwood trees in large numbers in the mountains. The area abounded in great numbers of bear, elk, deer, antelope, rabbits and sage hens. John was considered the best marksman in Calumet County, Wisconsin. Wild plums, cherries, currants, strawberries, gooseberries, raspberries and grapes grew in profusion. There were wild tulips, larkspur, sweet peas and morning glories in addition to wild onions and Indians potatoes. There was a coal mine two miles south of the fort site. John Mayer died 12 Oct 1891 at the age of 54. Mayer, John (I13093)
 
84 1900 U.S. Census shows J.H. Age 22 living alone in De Kalb, De Kalb Township, De Kalb County, IL McKibben, J.H. (I3226)
 
85 1901 ? Boston, MA Bigelow, Samuel (I1602)
 
86 24 Tamworth Road, Croydon, Surrey, UK Barley, Jessie Mabel (I17314)
 
87 404 First St.Versailles Boro.;Died of a Complication of Diseases Beam, Mary Elizabeth (I19591)
 
88 715 Walnut St., Versailles Beam, Anna C. (I23767)
 
89 England Deaths and Burials, 1538-1991. Salt Lake City, Utah: FamilySearch, 2013. Source (S272)
 
90 General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. T288, 546 rolls. Source (S145)
 
91 The Charles R. Hale Collection. Hale Collection of Connecticut Cemetery Inscriptions. Hartford, Connecticut: Connecticut State Library. Source (S190)
 
92
  • Florida Department of Health. Florida Marriage Index, 1927-2001. Florida Department of Health, Jacksonville, Florida.
  • Marriages records from various counties located in county courthouses and/or on microfilm at the Family History Library.
 
Source (S171)
 
93 Black", HRE Henry Iii "The (I21151)
 
94 Peterson, Laurel Bernice (I23487)
 
95 ?? Laurentia of Hainault (I13167)
 
96 Abbey Church Magherabegg Donegal Ireland Gore, Sir Sir Paul Baronet (I724)
 
97 Abigail contracted Typhoid Fever while serving as a nurse during the Revolutionary War at the Yellow Springs Hospital & Washington's Camp. She never quite recovered from the illness and eventually died as a result of it. Hartman, Maria "Abigail" Appolonia (I25588)
 
98 abt. 24 years old Mayer, Mary (I9278)
 
99 Accidental Fall Thompson, Mary Lucretia (I26309)
 
100 According to family tradition, Moses Cleveland came to New England in 1635 as "a ship's carpenter's apprentice, and worked his passage over. It is generally stated that he came from Ipswich as an indentured apprentice to a joiner, housewright or master builder, name of his master not ascertained,but conjectured to be Edward Winn ( whose daughter he afterwards married), for 'he went to Woburn with his master,' and there settled in 1640-1;" admitted a freeman in 1643; granted land at Woburn 1648-9; listed on Woburn militia roll 1663 at age 39. from:The American Forbears and Some of the Descedents of Charles Theron Brown and His Wife Martha Elizabeth Hebbard, Michael R. Gannett, 1978 It has also been said that Moses and the group he was with came first to Virginia to settle but having to much trouble with the Indians, they boarded a ship and came up the coast to Plymouth. According to family tradition, Moses Cleveland came to New England in 1635 as "a ship's carpenter's apprentice, and worked his passage over. It is generally stated that he came from Ipswich as an indentured apprentice to a joiner, housewright or master builder, name of his master not ascertained,but conjectured to be Edward Winn ( whose daughter he afterwards married), for 'he went to Woburn with his master,' and there settled in 1640-1;" admitted a freeman in 1643; granted land at Woburn 1648-9; listed on Woburn militia roll 1663 at age 39. from:The American Forbears and Some of the Descedents of Charles Theron Brown and His Wife Martha Elizabeth Hebbard, Michael R. Gannett, 1978 It has also been said that Moses and the group he was with came first to Virginia to settle but having to much trouble with the Indians, they boarded a ship and came up the coast to Plymouth. Cleveland, Moses (I16727)
 

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